Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is my claim worth?

This is a complex question. One reason you want an experienced attorney representing you with your personal injury claim is we have experience with this calculation. Elements of this determination include your age and income, your medical expenses and any future medical costs, the effect of the injury on your other interests and activities, and whether any of the injuries will be permanent such as with spinal injuries, loss of a limb, sight or hearing. It is critical that your compensation be adequate for what may be lifelong alterations in your abilities, career prospects and enjoyment of life.

Should I give my insurance company a recorded statement?

No. Your well-intentioned statements, if confused or mistaken, could later be used by an insurance company to deny or reduce your claim. Remember the line from Miranda rights about "Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law?" The same is true of insurance companies.

They use these recorded statements to obtain evidence to deny your claim. If you later contradict some part of the statement, your credibility is called into question. Our attorneys will speak for you and ensure all statements are accurate and your words cannot be manipulated by clever insurance company lawyers.

How long does the claims settlement process take?

There is no one answer for this. One medical malpractice victim may suffer a "never event" and the hospital and its insurers quickly work to settle the matter. A resident at nursing home may be injured and the facility and its insurers dispute every claim, forcing months of discovery, depositions and eventually a trial. The complexity of your condition, the clarity of the causation, the entity you face all influence the speed of a settlement.

What is a contingent fee?

With a contingent-fee agreement, your attorney does not charge a direct, hourly rate or require a set retainer fee. Instead, the attorney receives a percentage of the settlement or verdict as payment. This arrangement allows many injured persons to bring lawsuits that they would otherwise be unable to afford.

What is Missouri's deadline for filing a claim?

The deadline for filing claims is known as a statute of limitation. For information about the statute of limitations on your claim you will need to speak with an attorney.

What does "mitigation of damages" mean?

After you have been injured, it is important that you "mitigate" your damages. This means you should obtain medical treatment and make a reasonable effort to avoid conduct that could make your condition worse or increase the cost of repair for damaged property, like a vehicle.

Contact Our Firm In Kansas City

We offer free initial consultations for you to meet our attorneys and get started with your case. Don't wait a day longer — the earlier you get started, the stronger your case could be. Call 816-875-0684 to schedule your consultation, or reach out online to make an appointment.